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NAS Annual Meeting
MEETING

NAS Annual Meeting Begins

April 24 - The National Academy of Sciences will hold its 152nd annual meeting April 25 to 28. NAS will video webcast selected presentations and ceremonies. Follow the annual meeting activities on Twitter @theNASciences and join the conversation #NAS152.

  • MEETING

    NAS Annual Meeting Begins

    April 24 - The National Academy of Sciences will hold its 152nd annual meeting April 25 to 28. NAS will video webcast selected presentations and ceremonies. Follow the annual meeting activities on Twitter @theNASciences and join the conversation #NAS152.

  • NEW REPORT

    Highway Research and Innovation

    April 23 - A new National Research Council report discusses the Federal Highway Administration's critical role in research, development, and technology to transform the nation's aging network of highways into one that is safer, more reliable, and more resilient.

  • NEW REPORT

    Overcoming Barriers to Adoption of
    Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    April 22 - Reducing vehicle cost, especially through the development of cheaper, high-performance batteries, and enhancing consumer knowledge are among the ways to increase acceptance of plug-in electric vehicles, says a new National Research Council report.

  • NEW REPORT

    Digital Curation Policies
    and Expertise Needed

    April 22 - Organizations are collecting huge amounts of data and information, but the policies, infrastructure, and workforce needed to manage this information have not kept pace, says a new National Research Council report. 

Spring 2015 Henry and Bryna David Lecture - April 28

Kathleen Hall Jamieson will deliver the Spring 2015 Henry and Bryna David Lecture on "Communicating the Value and Values of Science," in which she will discuss exemplary and problematic scientific communication and outline ways that communicators can express scientific values and the value of science. Jamieson is a professor of communication at the University of Pennsylvania and directs the Annenberg Public Policy Center, where she helped create FactCheck.org and SciCheck, sites dedicated to factual accuracy within public discourse in politics and science. The lecture begins at 5 p.m. EDT Tuesday, April 28, and will be video webcast live.

FBI Review Finds Flaws in Forensic Testimony

An FBI review of criminal cases involving microscopic hair analysis found that erroneous testimony was given by FBI analysts in at least 90 percent of the cases reviewed. A 2009 report by the National Research Council concluded that microscopic hair analysis is not reliable enough to connect individuals to hair found at a crime scene, and that forensic testimony commonly fails to acknowledge the uncertainties and possibility of error involved in forensic techniques. The FBI review, the 2009 report, and the need for greater rigor in the forensic sciences are also discussed in a  New York Times op-ed.

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